Visit the Abuyadaya

A trip to Uganda is a once in a lifetime opportunity. There are many  issues and details that need to happen before your trip. For advice, please contact:

Ari Greenspan – ari@greenspandental.com

Ari Zivotofsky – ari.zivotofsky@biu.ac.il

Travel information to visit the Abuyadaya

For contacts in the Kempala Jewish community, click here:

Visa Information

The CDC recommends the following health practices:

 
Find Out Why Protect Yourself

All travelers

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel.

Routine vaccines Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines before every trip. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot. get_vaccinated hygiene

Most travelers

Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting.

Hepatitis A CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Uganda, regardless of where you are eating or staying. get_vaccinated eat_drink
Malaria You will need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria. Your doctor can help you decide which medicine is right for you, and also talk to you about other steps you can take to prevent malaria. See more detailed information aboutmalaria in Uganda. antimalarial_meds avoid_insects
Typhoid You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Uganda. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater. get_vaccinated eat_drink
Yellow Fever Health recommendation: Yellow fever is a risk in Uganda, so CDC recommends this vaccine for all travelers who are 9 months of age or older.Country entry requirement: The government of Uganda also requiresproof of yellow fever vaccination if you are traveling from a country with risk of yellow fever (this does not include the US – for complete list, see Countries with risk of yellow fever virus (YFV) transmission.)See more information on yellow fever recommendations and requirements for Uganda. get_vaccinated avoid_insects

Some travelers

Ask your doctor what vaccines and medicines you need based on where you are going, how long you are staying, what you will be doing, and if you are traveling from a country other than the US.

Polio You may need a polio vaccine before your trip to Uganda, especially if you are working in a health care facility, refugee camp, or humanitarian aid setting. This kind of work might put you in contact with someone with polio.

  • If you were vaccinated against polio as a child but have never had a polio booster dose as an adult, you should get this booster dose. Adults need only one polio booster in their lives.
  • If you were not completely vaccinated as a child or do not know your vaccination status, talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated.
get_vaccinated eat_drinkhygiene
Hepatitis B You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures. get_vaccinated avoid_body_fluidsavoid-non-sterile-equipment
Meningitis (Meningococcal disease) Uganda is part of the “meningitis belt” of sub-Saharan Africa (see map). CDC recommends this vaccine if you plan to visit Uganda during the dry season (December–June), when the disease is most common. get_vaccinated hygiene
Rabies Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Uganda, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups:

  • Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites.
  • People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers).
  • People who are taking long trips or moving to Uganda
  • Children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck.
get_vaccinated animals

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Uganda. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?
  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.
What type of insect repellent should I use?
  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or moreDEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST MOSQUITOES ONLY:Products with one of the following active ingredients can also help prevent mosquito bites. Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection.
    • DEETExternal Web Site Icon
    • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD
    • IR3535
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.
What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?
  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.
What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs.   Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

The Abuyadaya